Saxophone Forum


by bobbystern
(38 posts)
6 years ago

Some Diminished Scale Applications

The 8 note, symmetrical "Diminished Scale", has the ability to be broken down into smaller elements and combined, at intervals, to create some hip and interesting lines.

Check out this free, downloadable PDF for one such example.

Reply To Post [Report Abuse]

Report Abuse

Replies

  1. by kelsey
    (930 posts)

    6 years ago

    Re: Some Diminished Scale Applications

    Wouldn't it be simplier, save paper, just writing it out in one key? The student could learn more by tranposing to the different keys themself.

    Barry Kelsey

    Reply To Post AIM


    1. by bobbystern
      (38 posts)

      6 years ago

      Re: Some Diminished Scale Applications

      Be my guest!

      B.

      Reply To Post


      1. by kelsey
        (930 posts)

        6 years ago

        Re: Some Diminished Scale Applications

        Sorry if I've offended you. One of the ways I've learned to play and to teach others has been listening to the masters, picking up small ideas by ear from them, then practicing the ideas by taking to different keys. I only meant what I wrote as a friendly suggestion.

        Barry Kelsey

        Reply To Post AIM


        1. by bobbystern
          (38 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: Some Diminished Scale Applications

          Barry,

          No offense taken; sorry if it came accross that way.

          Ultimately, material to be used for improvisation has to be internalized, regardless as to how it's done. Some melodic material is more familiar and easier to transpose by ear than others. Diatonic Maj. scale, bebop licks, blues riffs, etc. might fall into that category.

          Once you get into melodic minor, and less familiar symmetrical scale, chromatic and intervallic patterns, for example, it becomes a bit more difficult to "hear" right away.

          With today's availability of notation software, it becomes easier and less time consuming to have a phrase transposed accross the keys and range of your instrument, ready for you to see, play, hear, feel and internalize, than spending time fumbling around trying to find it, and writing it down anyway so you don't forget it!

          Once you have it transposed, you don't necessarily have to rely on the page, but it's there to refer to, any time you need it!

          All I can say is; it's worked for me, and I'm thankful for it.

          Reply To Post


        2. by kelsey
          (930 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: Some Diminished Scale Applications

          I understand what you are saying and now agree with what you are doing. I'm an older style Bebop player.  I play and learned as you first described, more Diatonic and modal Bebop playing (Sonny Rollins, Dex. Bird...some Trane ..ect.) If I wanted to get into the post Bebop Jazz thing I would profit from your advice......Thanks for responding....Kelsey 

          Barry Kelsey

          Reply To Post AIM