Saxophone Forum


by stevenorris41
(4 posts)
1 year ago

Silver Soprano Sax Dec 9, 1914

Hello,

my my dad is wanting to get some info about his saxophone. I’m not sure of even the brand. It does have an engraving on it that says “Common Wealth” it looks to have the Bunker Hill monument  in between the word Common (and) Wealth. 

It also has the following numbers engraved.

PATD DEC 9, 1914
1119954
S
35790
L

Any info you would know would be a trendous help.

Thank you! 

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  1. by historicsaxwhisperer
    (504 posts)

    1 year ago

    Re: Silver Soprano Sax Dec 9, 1914

    That is a nice soprano.

    It is keyed in B flat which is correct.

    L means low pitch A=440 which is correct.

    The patent date and the number below it are from the maker C G Conn.

    It is what is known as a stencil horn.

    Stencil means somebody purchased a group of horns from Conn in this instance

     and had them engraved with their own chosen logo.

     Maybe as few as 10 to 25 horns. Maybe many more.

     Manufactured in the 1920-1923 range.

    Set up correctly it would be worth 900 or more.

    It may cost you close to that to set it up correctly.

    I know that because refurbishing horns is what I do for fun and why I am here.

     

    Good Luck

     

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    1. by stevenorris41
      (4 posts)

      1 year ago

      Re: Silver Soprano Sax Dec 9, 1914

      Thank you SO much for all of that helpful info. I did have it refurbished about 15 years ago for my dad and remember spending about $600 doing it. It is definitely due for a little work. I‘d like to ask you about his Conn Tenor sax and maybe you can give me the info on that one too. This one needs some TLC, but my dad said the tenors aren’t as widespread as other saxophones. Any info you can tell me would be much appreciated. Thank you!

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      1. by historicsaxwhisperer
        (504 posts)

        1 year ago

        Re: Silver Soprano Sax Dec 9, 1914

        Now that is a Conn 10M from the best time frame of the Conn 10ms.

        From around 1936.

        That is a great $3000 sax.

        Here is one in the same time frame in silver plate at RETAIL

        https://www.saxquest.com/product/view/vintage-cg-conn-10m-original-silver-plated-naked-lady-tenor-sax-serial-311959-P12425

        Dont give it away!!

        They are getting harder to find everyday.

        Its value will only go up.

        The case is a replacement Conn case.

        Good Luck

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        1. by stevenorris41
          (4 posts)

          6 months ago

          Re: Silver Soprano Sax Dec 9, 1914

          Thank you for the info.... I meant to share with you that the first saxophon you were telling me about (the silver soprano) a gentleman told me some more info that he thought about it...  do you agree with him?

           

            Actually this is a stencil of the Pan American model 58M, vintage circa 1929.

          The Common-Wealth brand was brand Trademarked by Maxwell Meyers of Boston and launched in 1927.

          The interesting part of this Soprano is the stamping of the Dec 8 1914 stamp indicating the Haynes Tone-Hole license. By this time Pan American was using the Hardy Sep 14, 1915 tone hole stamp.

          It is not Conn in the way the term implies:
          Pan American was a relatively independent manufacturing subsidiary of CG Conn Ltd, incorporated in Jul 1919, with its own separate factory opening in Nov 1919. All stencils came from the Pan American factory and its models.

          CG Conn Ltd was brand, manufacturer and holding company like General Motors with GM, Cadillac, Buick, Chevrolet, etc subsidiaries. Pan American was one of Conn's. Conn Ltd the manufacturer was another subsidiary.    

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        2. by historicsaxwhisperer
          (504 posts)

          6 months ago

          Re: Silver Soprano Sax Dec 9, 1914

          No I do not agree whatsoever.

          The patent information on the instrument is strictly conn, not Pan American, which conn absorbed in later years.

          The patent information is put on an instrument in order to be very specific.

          In any event, it is a vintage soprano nearly 100 years old.

          The specifics are quite redundant.

           

          Good Luck

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