Saxophone Forum


by Kelli
(3 posts)
17 years ago

Buescher True Tone SN # 110658 (low pitch)

I recieved an estimate of value on this horn from some one last week. The estimate was 900 alto to 1200 tenor in mint condition. It was also stated that if in good condition this horn could be worth a bundle. Can anymore tell me what is the difference between mint and good. What would I look for me to determine the state of my sax? The sax reads true tone low pitch under the sn#. Is my sax a tenor? The finish on the horn is silver and the inside of the bell is gold. What are these finishes? I am very interest in selling this horn but do not know where to begin. I also wanted to ask if I shoudll have the horn professional refurbished before selling or sell as is? I want the most value out of the deal? If anyone can help with these questions, I would love to here from YOu. Thanks kelli

Reply To Post [Report Abuse]

Report Abuse

Replies

  1. by Sax Mom
    (964 posts)

    17 years ago

    Re: Buescher True Tone SN # 110658 (low pitch)

    If you click on free trading at the top of this page and then in the left-hand column, they do offer appraisals. Many instrument technicians will also give appraisals for a nominal fee.

    Reply To Post


  2. by johnsonfromwisconsin
    (767 posts)

    17 years ago

    Re: Buescher True Tone SN # 110658 (low pitch)

    -------------------------------------------------------------- Can anymore tell me what is the difference between mint and good. --------------------------------------------------------------- Mint as a term is overused. Originally, it refers to twice-struck coins that have never seen circulation and are without blemish or imperfection. The corresponding equivalent condition of a saxophone wouldn't allow it to leave the showroom. In my opinion, there is no such thing as a mint condition second hand instrument. Rather, when describing the condition of a horn, it's much more usefull to express the condition of the finish (in your case, silver plate) and the bell wash (gold or copper plating inside the bell) in terms of a % of body coverage. You also need to note any dents or scratches, and any marring or signs of repair. Also, if it doesn't have a front F or is a very early model without the snaps or springs, the horn is worth considerably less. ------------------------------------------------------------------ Is my sax a tenor? ------------------------------------------------------------------ A Bb tenor's B cup would be about an inch above the bow-bell joint. A C-melodie's low B cup would be about 2+ inches from the bow. A C Melody is worth much less, same with an alto. --------------------------------------------------------------------- I also wanted to ask if I shoudll have the horn professional refurbished before selling or sell as is? --------------------------------------------------------------------- It depends, but usually not. If you indeed have a Bb Tenor who's plate is in great shape with only a few small dents and such, but it's been sitting around a long time and needs an overhaul, does it really make a whole lot of sense to spend $300-$400 on a horn you may only sell for $800? You also have to consider many technicians specialize in servicing school Vitos and the like, and aren't experienced in working with vintage horns or perhaps even overly concerned with maintaning the cosmetics of a professional instrument. They probably won't even have the right sort of pads for a vintage Buescher. Tecnnicians good at these things cost more. -My opinion

    Reply To Post