Saxophone Forum


by Musicman373
(2 posts)
16 years ago

C.G. Conn 6M Alto

I recently bought the Conn 6m (SN 326747) that was for sale on this site. I absolutely love it already and haven't decided whether it or my Mk VI should end up being my primary sax. But i have a few questions about the 6M. First, it aparently, from what i can tell, has an alternate G# key in between the F and E keys. I am pretty positive that is what it is, but i am just wondering, when you would really need to use that. Also, i haven't figured out how the double socket tuner neck works. If anyone can help me on that, it would be great.

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  1. by definition
    (963 posts)

    16 years ago

    Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

    the extra key would technically be called a 'G# trill key', and it really is useless, thats why no one puts them on horns anymore for the neck, you should be able to just throw the mpc on all the way, and then adjust intonation by turning the microtuner on the neck

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  2. by chiamac
    (586 posts)

    16 years ago

    Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

    I need to get a new mpc for my 6m so I can start having fun with it... anyway, yes it has a G# trill key and it's pretty useless unless you're doing a trill. My 10M tenor has that and a Eb one that's currently not active. The microtuner is easy... righty-tighty and it goes in, lefty-loosey and it comes out! =)

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  3. by Radjammin
    (255 posts)

    16 years ago

    Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

    I played a 6m for 8 years. Great horn. G# is usefull because of the sax design. People that say it's not makes me question if they really have a 6m. Not really, but I still ponder their answer. The 6M is designed witth bell keys on the backside, to allow for the bell artwork. I am sure there is other reason, just this is the most obvious. Because of this the Spatula keys go in the oposite direction then most horns. Because of this, the normal G# trill would be the most aukward thing in the world to try to trill with. That's why they have the G# trill, to be able to smothly trill G#. If you can smothly trill with the normal G# you have just recently been descovered to have the strongest pinky on the earth and the Giness Book officials will be right over. The Micro tuner? Well the short answer, don't use it even if it works. Mine worked great, I still didn't use it. Why? Because on the inside of the chamber as you extend the neck it exposes the rivits to the air flow causing unwanted air direction changes. Now I have to say I was only told this, I have never taken it apart to verify it. But for me the explaination seemed right, as I can't think of a way if the next extened it wouldn't change the air flow. Hope that helped, enjoy the horn I allways did.

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    1. by chiamac
      (586 posts)

      16 years ago

      Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

      I did unscrew my micro a few times for fun, although it was dark inside so I can't confirm rivits or anything. I'll check sometime if I remeber.

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      1. by Lefty
        (21 posts)

        16 years ago

        Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

        In a worst-case scenario, the microtuner apparatus could be the source of a leak. The corked end of the neck is a sleeve that slides over the tube of the neck, its position on the neck determined by the microtuner adjustment. A little imagination could create a hypothetical situation (neck disassembled, then dropped, then forced back together, etc.) where this could occur. On the other hand, in too-many years of sax repair, I've seen this twice, for sure. No rivets, but a sliding tongue-in-groove type of thing. Lefty

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        1. by connsaxman_jim
          (2336 posts)

          16 years ago

          Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

          The alternate G# is handy for some fingerings. It takes some getting used to. The microtuners are nice when they work. The purpose of the microtuner is as definition said. You put the mouthpiece on all the way. If the horn is sharp, you turn to the left to adjust the mouthpiece out. If it's flat, you screw it in. But, when the microtuner is worn, it can cause problems. If the mouthpiece turns on the neck, your best bet is to screw the microtuner all the way in, and pull out on the mouthpiece to adjust tuning.

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        2. by Musicman373
          (2 posts)

          16 years ago

          Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

          hmmm...... i guess my microtuner doesn't work then, it won't turn at all in either direction, o well, the good old fashion tuning works too.

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        3. by Dave Dix
          (421 posts)

          16 years ago

          Re: C.G. Conn 6M Alto

          You can soak the tuner in pb blaster etc for a while to loosen it up, they do tend to get gunked up Dave

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